Wildlife, Cake And Cocktails
WCC Ep.54. Brisbane Python Project with Chantelle Derez (Ft. Scott Eipper)

WCC Ep.54. Brisbane Python Project with Chantelle Derez (Ft. Scott Eipper)

February 1, 2020

We’re out in the field with Chantelle “Chilli” Derez, PhD student studying urban snake ecology at the UQ Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science, for the first #BrisbanePythonProjectBlitz! Chantelle is treasurer of the UQ Herpetological Society, a wildlife carer with Reptile Rehab QLD, and member of the SaveTheSnakes Advisory Committee. Her research is currently focussed on radio-tracking Carpet Pythons to understanding movement behaviour in natural and urban habitats. After discussing urban snake ecology, including issues with urban snake translocations and more, we join a group of keen herpetologists at a local wildlife reserve for the first #BrisbanePythonProject blitz, searching for more snakey-subjects for Chilli’s ongoing radio-tracking project.

Check out The Brisbane Python Project on Facebook @BrisbanePythonProject

Chantelle on Twitter & Facebook @ChantelleDerez

SaveTheSnakes @SaveTheSnakes and savethesnakes.org

UQ Herp Society on Twitter & Facebook @UQherp

Reptile Rehab QLD on Twitter & Facebook@ReptileRehabQld, or reptilerehabilitationqld.org/

 
 
 
 
 
WCC Ep.53. Platypus eDNA with Tamielle Brunt

WCC Ep.53. Platypus eDNA with Tamielle Brunt

November 22, 2019

We’re joined by Tamielle Brunt, PhD student at UQ studying the distribution and habitat requirements of Platypuses around South-East QLD. Tamielle has a passion for these amazing aquatic monotremes, engaging local communities in WildlifeQLD’s Platypus Watch programs since 2016. We discuss her PhD research, including eDNA monitoring to guide planning for the persistence of platypus populations, urban and naturalized habitat requirements, and much more, over Moon River cocktails and Mudcake!

Follow Tamielle on Twitter@tamiellebrunt and IG@platypus_protector.

Check out Platypus Watch at Wildlife.org.au/platypuswatch

 

New Research:

Richmond et al. 2018 A diverse suite of pharmaceuticals contaminates stream and riparian food webs. Nature Communications. 9. 4491. DOI:10.1038/s41467-018-06822-w.

Asahara et al. '16. Comparative cranial morphology in living and extinct platypuses: Feeding behavior, electroreception, and loss of teeth. Science Advances. 2, 10. e1601329
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1601329.

Carrick et al. 2019 Limitations on the use of historical and database sources to identify changes in distribution and abundance of the platypus. Response to A silent demise: Historical insights into population changes of the iconic platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). Global Ecology and Conservation. 20:e00777. DOI: doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2019.e00777.

WCC Ep.52. Spiders of Australia with Robert Whyte

WCC Ep.52. Spiders of Australia with Robert Whyte

November 1, 2019

We’re talking all things spidery with Robert Whyte, arachnologist at Queensland Museum. Rob is a scientist, author, editor, photographer, and science communicator with a passion for Australian spiders. In 2017, along with images from Greg Anderson, he authored “A Field Guide to Spiders of Australia”, the most comprehensive account of Australian spiders ever produced. In 2018 he revived the AustralasianArachnologicalSociety.org website & newsletter. Rob has also been working with the BushBlitz biodiversity exploration programs since 2012 to find new spider species around the country. At last year’s Cooloola BioBlitz, he lead the spider team to discover 37 new species, with even more this year! As an advocate for #SciComm, he is currently producing and presenting the upcoming web-series #JoltScienceTV with Sandra Tuszynska. Rob is also an avid volunteer with habitat restoration projects such as SaveOurWaterwaysNow, and wrote “The Creek In Our Backyard: A practical guide for habitat restoration” now a 2nd expanded edition since 2013.

Follow Rob on Twitter @robertwhyte and Queensland Museum @qldmuseum

And watch for new episodes of #JoltScinceTV at JoltScience.com.au

WCC Ep.51. Feeding The Birds At My Table Booklaunch with Prof. Darryl Jones

WCC Ep.51. Feeding The Birds At My Table Booklaunch with Prof. Darryl Jones

October 18, 2019

With huge thanks to Avid Reader Bookshop in Brisbane’s West End, we were invited to have a discussion with the amazing Darryl Jones, Professor of Ecology at Griffith University, for the launch of his latest book, “Feeding The Birds At My Table – A Guide For Australia” from NewSouth Publishing. Prof. Darryl Jones is the Deputy Director of Griffith’s Environmental Futures Research Institute, working on understanding human-wildlife interactions. He’s the author of over 170 scientific articles and six books, including The Birds At My Table (2018) and now, the follow-up, Feeding The Birds At My Table (2019). The book is a not only an exploration of the challenges to safely and ethically feeding birds in your backyard, it’s also a practical guide for how to improve our bird feeding habits and practices here in Australia. We discuss bird feeding culture and research in Australia, ethical bird feeding problems and solutions, and much more. Join us for this fantastic launch event hosted by Avid Reader Bookshop!

 

Check out the link below to order the book today!

 newsouthpublishing.com/articles/feeding-birds-your-table/

 

Follow Prof. Darryl Jones on Twitter @MagpiejonesD

 

Check out the happenings at Avid Reader on Twitter @AvidReader4101

WCC Ep.50. Acid Frog Conservation with Alannah Filer, Debra Stark & Callum McKercher

WCC Ep.50. Acid Frog Conservation with Alannah Filer, Debra Stark & Callum McKercher

September 16, 2019

We’re talking all things #Froggy with frog conservation scientists Alannah Filer, Debra Stark, and Callum McKercher! Alannah is a PhD student at the Uni of Queensland studying distribution mapping and bioacoustics in frogs, particularly the low pH specialized acid frogs. Debra, also at UQ, is involved in bioacoustic monitoring of acid frogs, education, and using technologies such as VR to bring students into the field. Callum is currently starting his PhD at Uni of New England, studying alpine wetland ecosystems near Armidale. Over some Surfer-On-Acid cocktails and froggy cupcakes, we discuss monitoring the threatened Acid Frogs, bioacoustics, and much more!

Check out some of Alannah’s work at Rhodesconservation.com and SpatialEcology.com

Follow Debra on Twitter at @debra_93

Follow Callum on Instagram at @calsphotography12

WCC Ep.49. Student Conference on Conservation Science, Brisbane 2019 - Pt. 1 (Guests and Poster Presentations)

WCC Ep.49. Student Conference on Conservation Science, Brisbane 2019 - Pt. 1 (Guests and Poster Presentations)

September 16, 2019

We’re super exited to share some of the amazing conservation students and researchers from the 2019 Student Conference on Conservation Science in Brisbane, Australia! WCC was lucky to score an invite to attend some of the incredible student talks, plenary speakers, poster presentations, and we even managed a handful of special guest interviews (see below for segment times). In this first part, we share interviews with student poster presenters and special guest speakers.

With so many amazing student researchers and conservationists in various fields from across the world congregating at the Uni of Queensland for this conference, we barely scratched the surface and wish we had time for more. Nonetheless, we hope you enjoy these presentations and interviews from numerous conservation students across a broad swath of scientific disciplines, just a small sample of the breadth of knowledge and talent involved in biodiversity conservation around the world.

For more on #SCCSAus2019, check out SCCS-aus.org, Facebook@SCCSAus, and Twitter@SCCS_Aus

 

Segments as follows:

 

Prof. Bill Laurence          (3:50)          James Cook University

Prof. Sarah Bekessy        (27:23)       RMIT

Prof. Hugh Possingham  (37:19)        University of Queensland

Dr. April Reside               (43:43)      University of Queensland

WCC Ep.48. Sea Snake Conservation with Blanche D’Anastasi

WCC Ep.48. Sea Snake Conservation with Blanche D’Anastasi

July 15, 2019

We’re joined by Blanche D’Anastasi to talk Sea Snakes, along with some insanely decadent Ocean Cake and Negronis to finish #NegroniWeek2019! Blanche is a marine biologist, applied conservation researcher & sea-snake expert, currently completing a PhD on threatened sea snakes at James Cook University. She’s a member of the International Union for Conservation of Nature Sea Snake Specialist Group, contributor to the IUCN Global Status Review of Sawfish, and research partner with OceanWise Australia. Blanche is also the Director of the Deadly Science Getaway, inspiring passion for science & leadership among young Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women through remote field science expeditions. We discuss all things sea-snake related over our very rich drink and dessert pairing J Enjoy, and Happy #NegroniWeek everyone!

For more on the #DeadlyScienceGetaway, check out @deadly_science on Twitter and @deadlyscience on Facebook.

You can follow Blanche @SeaSnakeBlanche on Twitter & Instagram, check out @JCU on Twitter and @JamesCookUniversity on Facebook, and @OceanwiseAustralia for more awesome ocean conservation action.

For Sea-Snake ID, questions, and more, check out @AustralianSeaSnakes and @SeaSnakesGlobal on Facebook.

We’re joined by Blanche D’Anastasi to talk Sea Snakes, along with some insanely decadent Ocean Cake and Negronis to finish #NegroniWeek2019! Blanche is a marine biologist, applied conservation researcher & sea-snake expert, currently completing a PhD on threatened sea snakes at James Cook University. She’s a member of the International Union for Conservation of Nature Sea Snake Specialist Group, contributor to the IUCN Global Status Review of Sawfish, and research partner with OceanWise Australia. Blanche is also the Director of the Deadly Science Getaway, inspiring passion for science & leadership among young Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women through remote field science expeditions. We discuss all things sea-snake related over our very rich drink and dessert pairing J Enjoy, and Happy #NegroniWeek everyone!

For more on the #DeadlyScienceGetaway, check out @deadly_science on Twitter and @deadlyscience on Facebook.

You can follow Blanche @SeaSnakeBlanche on Twitter & Instagram, check out @JCU on Twitter and @JamesCookUniversity on Facebook, and @OceanwiseAustralia for more awesome ocean conservation action.

For Sea-Snake ID, questions, and more, check out @AustralianSeaSnakes and @SeaSnakesGlobal on Facebook.

New Research:

Lillywhite et al. (2019) Drinking by sea snakes from oceanic freshwater lenses at first rainfall ending seasonal drought. PLoS ONE 14:2.

(https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0212099)

Sherratt et al. (2018) Trophic specialization drives morphological evolution in sea snakes. R. Soc. Open Sci. 5: 172141.

(https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.172141)

Suntrarachun et al. (2018). Identification of sea snake meat adulteration in meat products using PCR-RFLP of mitochondrial DNA. Food Science and Human Wellness, 7(2), 170–174. 

(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fshw.2018.04.002)

WCC Ep.47. Bats: From Myth to Mystery with Prof. Stuart Parsons

WCC Ep.47. Bats: From Myth to Mystery with Prof. Stuart Parsons

June 13, 2019

WCC joins Prof. Stuart Parsons, zoologist and bat specialist from QUT, to chat all things batty before his presentation at the Wildlife Preservation Society of Queensland’s Brisbane Branch!

Prof. Parsons is the Head of School in Earth, Environment & Biological Sciences at the Queensland University of Technology. With a broad interest in sensory ecology & animal behaviour, his research ranges from auditory anatomy and biological sonar to mating systems, and more. Much of his work involves the bats of the world, but also insects, birds and whales, often with a focus on bioacoustics. He’s the May 2019 guest speaker at the WPSQ Bris Branch, presenting “Bats: from Myth to Majesty”.

Photo credit: Queensland University of Technology 

WCC Ep.46. Cane Toads, Goannas, and CTA with Dr Georgia Ward-Fear

WCC Ep.46. Cane Toads, Goannas, and CTA with Dr Georgia Ward-Fear

June 5, 2019

We’re talking cane toads, goannas, and traditional ecological knowledge with Dr. Georgia Ward-Fear while enjoying caramel-vanilla slice and a Sweet Poison cocktail! Dr. Ward-Fear is a conservation ecologist at the University of Sydney with a broad interest in evolution, ecology, invasive species, reptiles, and more. We chat about her fascinating PhD research and conservation program, training wild yellow-spotted monitor lizards to avoid poisonous cane toads via Conditioned Taste Aversion. We also discuss the vital role of indigenous ranger collaboration for the success of this novel conservation program. 

Follow Dr. Georgia Ward-Fear Twitter @g_wardfear, and check out www.canetoadcoalition.com

 

New Research:

Ward-Fear 2016 Ecological immunization: in situ training of free-ranging predatory lizards reduces their vulnerability to invasive toxic prey. Biology Letters. Vol. 12, Issue 1. https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/abs/10.1098/rsbl.2015.0863

 

Ward‐Fear et al 2019 Sharper eyes see shyer lizards: Collaboration with indigenous peoples can alter the outcomes of conservation research. Conservation Letters. Online early. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/conl.12643

WCC Ep.45. Cooloola BioBlitz 2019

WCC Ep.45. Cooloola BioBlitz 2019

May 26, 2019

WCC is back out at Rainbow Beach for Cooloola BioBlitz 2019, organised by Cooloola Coast Care Inc. and the Fraser Island Defenders Organisation. Cooloola BioBlitz is a weekend of biological survey to record as many of the living species as possible in the Cooloola Sands region, and this second survey is sure to be a blast!

We chat with some of the awesome scientific team leaders and organisers about their weekend full of discoveries and citizen science action.

For more, check out@CooloolaBioBlitz and @CooloolaCoastcare on Facebook, or CooloolaCoastcare.org.au.

FIDO details can be found at @FraserIslandDefendersOrganisation.

You can also check out @iNaturalist on Facebook and Twitter, or iNaturalist.org